Tag Archives: Middle East

Episode 46 – Beneath the Sands



During World War II, an Englishman named T.E. Lawrence fought in the Arab uprising against the Ottoman Empire. While travelling, “Lawrence of Arabia” learned of a majestic city that he dubbed “The Atlantis of the Sands”, a kingdom that been buried under the dunes of the Empty Quarter. But this lost city was well known to the Arab world; it had appeared in the 1,001 Nights and was even mentioned by name in The Quran. Is Ubar, or Iram of the Pillars, waiting to be unearthed?

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Music featured in this episode:
“Hidden Wonders” “Curse of the Scarab” “East of Tunisia” “Ibn Al-Noor” “Desert City” “Send for the Horses”
by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/


Episode 17 – The Italians Who Stole Christmas



The second holiday special! Saint Nicholas is one of Catholicism’s most honored Saints, a figure who would go on to inspire the folkloric character known as Santa Claus. But this Saint did not enjoy a peaceful rest in death. In 1087, an ambitious cabal of Italian sailors decided to rob his tomb in a get-rich-quick controversy that, 1,000 years later, remains unresolved. Merry Christmas!

Music by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/


Episode 16 – A Light in the Temple; or Menorah, Menorah, I’m Lookin’ For Ya



The first of Relic’s two holiday specials! The menorah is a nine-pronged candle holder, ceremonially lit during the Jewish celebration of Hanukkah. It is modeled after a human-sized, gilded lamp that once sat in the sacred Temple of Jerusalem. Created after a brutal rebellion to take back the city, the original menorah remained in the temple for hundreds of years, until it was stolen by the Romans. Do their successors still have it?

Theme music by Devin. Music by Kevin MacLeod and Derek Fiechter.